Valentine Accuses Ortiz of Quitting

David Ortiz didn’t quit on the 2012 Red Sox, Bobby Valentine. He quit on you. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

After a horrific season in which the Boston Red Sox started bad, continued to be bad and then finished the season… bad … Bobby Valentine had a chance to walk away with some slight measure of dignity. He could’ve simply taken his firing like a man, then gone back to his gig on TV, which allows him to do what he does best: yell impotently analyze baseball.

Instead, Valentine chose to take one last pot-shot at the Red Sox. One last try at blaming the failures of his team on anybody but a manager hated by basically the entire state of Massachusetts, not to mention every one of his players and every Boston sports writer (though that last group tends to hate everybody).

So who did Valentine call out? David Ortiz. Valentine accused Ortiz of quitting on the Red Sox on an episode of Costas Tonight that aired Tuesday on NBC Sports Night.

It was a cowardly, baseless attack by a weak-willed snake-oil salesman of a “manager.” Red Sox fans would do well to ignore the criticism, anything else Valentine has said or might still say, and probably Valentine’s existence in general.

Would the Red Sox Re-Sign a Quitter?

Baseball, as the cliche goes, is a business. As such, looking at the deals a team makes, the money it spends, is the best way to understand said team’s true feelings.

If the Red Sox ownership really believed Ortiz quit on his team, then why are they trying to sign him to a new, two-year deal? Sure, “closing in” and “signed” can mean vastly different things in baseball language, but if the Red Sox really thought Ortiz bailed on an otherwise-promising season, why would they even bother with negotiations?

At the very least, they’d first test the DH market, then try to lowball Ortiz later.

Ortiz, after all, is a 36-year-old with bad knees, a clicking wrist, an already injured Achilles tendon and almost no fielding ability. Other teams wouldn’t exactly blow up his agent’s phone with new deals if the Red Sox chose to wait and see.

But instead, management went after him before the World Series even began. With $100 million in bad contracts handed over to the Dodgers (easily the best move of the year), John Henry & Co. decided to take care of Ortiz first.

If that doesn’t show loyalty and support, what does?

Youkilis Cut for Character Reasons?

As a stark contrast to Ortiz’s treatment by management, consider the fate of Kevin Youkilis. Youkilis also got hurt and missed considerable time last season, but instead of the Red Sox sticking with him, they traded him, and for not much in return.

So why did the Red Sox stick with Ortiz and not Youkilis? One possibility: Youkilis had become an issue in the clubhouse.

Many writers think Youkilis snitched to Bob Hohler about the drama behind the 2011 collapse. Neither Hohler nor anyone else has ever confirmed or dis-confirmed that speculation, so concluding definitively that the trade happened because Youkilis couldn’t be trusted is impossible.

Nevertheless, Youkils is three years younger than Ortiz, and when healthy, Youkilis brought more to the table (plays defense, can get on base, can hit from multiple spots on the lineup). So if the Red Sox didn’t nix Youkilis because of talent, perhaps they did so because of character.

Both Youkilis and Ortiz have had their characters questioned over the last year. But where Youkilis was traded, Ortiz looks to be coming back, and quickly.

Blame for 2012 lies elsewhere

Injuries notwithstanding, something absolutely derailed the 2012 Red Sox, and it’s named Bobby Valentine. Whereas Terry Francona got through to his players immediately, Valentine utterly failed to get his players on board.

A good skipper inspires loyalty in his players, even when fans and the press are screaming for the manager’s head. The 2005 White Sox defended Ozzie Guillen — another Billy Martin-esque blowhard whose mouth far exceeds his talent — because they loved playing for him.

Meanwhile, how many times during the media’s season-long barrage of criticism did any Red Sox players come to Valentine’s defense? Twice? Once? Never?

To be sure, such moments were few and far between. The rest of the time the Red Sox — Ortiz included — stayed silent because deep down, they hated Valentine as much the fans.

Ortiz didn’t quit on the Red Sox, Bobby V. He quit on you. And so did everyone else.

 

Ross Homers Twice in Red Sox Victory Over Twins

Cody Ross hits a two-run home run during the seventh inning of Monday's Red Sox-Twins game at Target Field in Minneapolis. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)

Cody Ross must be quite the social animal. Through his first four home runs this season, at least one teammate had always been on base, waiting at the plate to celebrate with him.

But sometimes, even Ross has to go it alone.

Ross homered twice – one two-run, one solo – tying and then giving the Boston Red Sox a 6-5 win over the Minnesota Twins Monday at Target Field. Daniel Bard picked up his first win in relief, and Alfredo Aceves recorded his third save.

Ross’ Homers Huge in Victory

The Red Sox entered the seventh inning down 5-3, still facing Twins starter Jason Marquis. Marquis had already thrown over 100 pitches when Jarrod Saltalamacchia – whose two-run golf shot in the second put the Red Sox up 3-0 – singled with one out, but Twins manager Ron Gardenhire opted to stick with him.

Ross made Gardenhire pay for his error just one pitch later, crushing a shot to left field to tie the game 5-5.

The tie held up until the top of the ninth, when Gardenhire went with closer Matt Capps. Ross came up with two down in the ninth, fouled one off, then deposited a knee-high pitch just over the right field wall for the 6-5 lead.

Ross finished the game 2-4, part of a 12-hit night for the Red Sox. Saltalamacchia, Ryan Sweeney, Dustin Pedroia and David Ortiz all also went 2-4.

Adrian Gonzalez went 0-3, but his first-inning sacrifice fly put the Red Sox up 1-0.

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With Bobby Valentine, Expect B.S. to Continue

New Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine really shouldn't be making this many off-the-field errors, but he has. Expect that to continue all season. (AP Photo/Duane Burleson)

Bobby Valentine has badly misfired twice in his first few weeks, setting up a weekly appearance gig on an ESPN New York radio program, then questioning Kevin Youkilis’ attitude after just a nine-day evaluation Sunday. And when Valentine opted not to play Youkilis on Patriots Day, Fenway serenaded him with a chorus of boos loud enough to throw Sharon Cherop off her game.

For a guy whose managed for 25 years (including six in media-saturated New York) and worked in broadcasting for two more, Valentine’s inability to avoid PR blunders like this is stupefying.

A young guy managing for the first time? Sure, he might say a few things that get taken the wrong way. Same goes for a long-standing manager who never worked for a big-market team – the Boston press craves drama in a way the Kansas City press doesn’t, and an unfamiliar manager could easily shoot himself in the foot.

But Valentine is neither of those things. He knows how a manager gets treated by the press, he knows how big-market media work, and he knows what in the past has gotten him into trouble. If anyone ought to know better than to insult a beloved player like Youkilis, it’s Valentine.

Valentine isn’t the first manager to take a “cavalier” approach to the press, nor even the first in a major market. Rex Ryan has played games with the press every fall since 2009, and he’s said some way dumber stuff than Valentine.

But Jets fans have rarely booed Ryan the way Sox fans laid into Valentine Monday. It’s not because Jets fans are nicer than Red Sox fans – both are pretty damn nasty, compared with other fanbases (fans of the Milwaukee Brewers, for instance, or the Phoenix Coyotes). New York fans just get that Ryan mouths off to take pressure off his players.

Ryan’s players get that too, which explains the iron-forged loyalty with which they defend him. But on the Red Sox, no one feels that loyalty yet. They protected Terry Francona until he lost the team midway through the 2011 season, but they haven’t had enough time to build any reverence for Valentine.

Continue reading With Bobby Valentine, Expect B.S. to Continue

Ten Red Sox Predictions for 2012

Jon Lester might win 16 or 17 games again this season, but no other starter will come close to his numbers. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)

Some definite patterns are emerging with the 2012 Boston Red Sox. What has and hasn’t worked so far could easily continue through the entire season. So after five games, here are 10 predictions for the upcoming season.

1) The starting pitching will combine for 60 wins or fewer. So far, no starting pitcher has recorded a win, and none have even left in position for a win. While Jon Lester will probably finish the season with decent numbers, no other starter inspires any sort of confidence. Whether it’s Josh Beckett‘s attitude, Clay Buchholz‘s health or Daniel Bard‘s inexperience starting, the Red Sox will probably be winning a lot of games in the last couple of innings.

Speaking of which…

2) The Red Sox will record at least 15 late-game-comeback victories. In four of their first five games, the Red Sox have combined for 10 runs in the ninth inning and later. This team’s experienced, big-moment hitters never cower before opposing setup men and closers, and that should mean lots of late-game heroics.

Which is good, because…

3) The bullpen will finish with an ERA over 4.50. This bullpen is terrrrrrrible! Alfredo Aceves rocked a perfect ninth Monday, but the day before he gave up a three-run home run. And he’s supposedly their best!

Unless, of course, you count…

Continue reading Ten Red Sox Predictions for 2012

Bobby Valentine Hiring Process Yet Another Misstep By Management

Because management lied to the Red Sox about hiring a disciplinarian like Bobby Valentine, the new manager will arrive with two strikes against him. (AP)

WEEI Red Sox reporter Alex Speier reported Wednesday that Bobby Valentine’s hiring as the new manager flies in the face of an administrative promise made earlier in the off-season that the team would not go after a disciplinarian. While the report did not state who made the promise or to which player, a similar report by ESPNBoston.com’s Joe McDonald suggests Speier is (as usual) right on the money.

If that’s the case, management’s decision to go with Valentine is yet another botched play from Ben Cherington and this suddenly bumbling ownership group.

Which Front-Office Staffer’s Nose is Growing?

GMs and owners shouldn’t have to consult with players on the majority of baseball operations. In many cases, what front-office guys do is either too complicated or too unrelated to be worth bothering players with.

But on the other hand, management should never straight-up lie to players, either. And that’s exactly what appears to have happened: Management told at least one player Valentine specifically would not be the next Red Sox manager, then they went ahead and hired him anyway.

They knew the Red Sox feared the arrival of a disciplinarian like Valentine after seven years of “player’s manager” Terry Francona. But instead of listening to the players and working with them to assuage their concerns, Cherington’s staff decided the best course of action was to ignore the players and sell them a line, then let Cherington unilaterally do whatever he wanted.

It was a cowardly, dishonest decision that does nothing to fix the widely held belief by fans that this new era is nothing but a pale shadow of the Francona-Theo Epstein era.

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